Forward Rate Agreement Uitleg

The FRA determines the rates to be used at the same time as the termination date and face value. FSOs are billed on the basis of the net difference between the contract interest rate and the market variable rate, the so-called reference rate, liquid severance pay. The nominal amount is not exchanged, but a cash amount based on price differences and the face value of the contract. The intermediate amount for the differentiated values of an FRA exchanged between the two parties and calculated from the perspective of the sale of an FRA (imitating the fixed interest rate) is calculated as follows:[1] Een forward is een termijncontract tussen twee partijen met als doel de rentekosten of opbrengsten voor een in de toekomst liggende period. De rentebaten op een belegging kunnen hiermee veiligld worden als een rentedaling te verwachten is. Company A enters into an FRA with Company B, in which Company A obtains a fixed interest rate of 5% on a capital amount of $1 million in one year. In return, Company B receives the one-year LIBOR rate set in three years on the amount of capital. The agreement is billed in cash in a payment made at the beginning of the term period, discounted by an amount calculated using the contract rate and the duration of the contract. Forward Rate Agreements (FRA) are over-the-counter contracts between parties that determine the interest rate payable at an agreed date in the future. An FRA is an agreement to exchange an interest rate bond on a fictitious amount. A futures contract is different from a futures contract. A foreign exchange date is a binding contract on the foreign exchange market that blocks the exchange rate for the purchase or sale of a currency at a future date. A currency program is a hedging instrument that does not include advance.

The other great advantage of a monetary maturity is that it can be adapted to a certain amount and delivery time, unlike standardized futures contracts. For example, if the Federal Reserve Bank is raising U.S. interest rates, known as the “monetary policy tightening cycle,” companies will likely want to set their borrowing costs before interest rates rise too quickly. In addition, GPs are very flexible and billing dates can be tailored to the needs of transaction participants. Many banks and large companies will use GPs to cover future interest rate or exchange rate commitments. The buyer opposes the risk of rising interest rates, while the seller protects himself against the risk of lower interest rates. Other parties that use interest rate agreements are speculators who only want to bet on future changes in interest rates. [2] Development swaps of the 1980s offered organizations an alternative to FRAs for protection and speculation.

Author: Franck Pertegas

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